10 books I’ve read this year that I’ve rated 5 Stars

Preamble

Are you a fellow book worm? Do you love the smell of books? Or the sensation of words filtering through your brain, constructing stories about far off places, and exotic people? Then you have clicked on the right post!

I’ve read 30 books this year and rated 10 of those books 5 out of 5 on Goodreads. I have listed them below in order of preference, but let us remember, they are all excellent for their own reasons.

*There are no spoilers, this is a spoiler-free post! Enjoy my friends*

10. “Sourcery” – Terry Pratchett

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Book Reviews

Look we don’t even need to have a discussion here. Terry Pratchett is a beloved author for so many reasons. He is a hero in the writing community. You cannot read his books without being both touched and entertained. Seriously there is a joke on every page, with his humour being a mixture of complete silliness and intellectualism.

This book picks up with Rincewind the wizard whom we left back in book two “The Light Fantastic.” Rincewind is as reluctant as ever to be the hero, yet cannot stop his fate of becoming paramount to the survival of the Discworld.

Why couldn’t he have stayed at home, on his tiny cot, with the luggage snoozing in the wardrobe?

9. “Swinging Sanity” – NF Mirza

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As far as debuts go, this is up there with the greats for me. I am a poetry fanatic, and very sensitive about its conjuncture. This wonderfully cathartic, yet tragic piece of work filled the gaps of my broken heart, as she waxed about pain, love, life, and the pursuit of elusive joy.

The work is divided into five parts, each a protective canopy over its subject matter. Beginning with “Screaming Numbness” we are treated to exquisitely painful lyrics about suffering and mental illness.

We press on into the pages of “Love & Loss” as she tells her tales from the world of love. As humans, we are never free from pain. We are allowed moments of beauty as a reprieve between the senseless chaos of the universe.

When the flushes of pain and joy are over we are treated to poems about the “Day and Night.” Her suffering mind remembers these times so vividly, and her fascination of the night sky appeals to fellow insomniac in me.

Life is a dazzling series of confusion and clarity. Mirza’s section, “C’est La Vie” has some hard truths about the world we try to live in. When I read these lines they ignite in me my own fears, wonders, and imagination.

The final section “Random Thoughts,” is just that, and we see the author grappling with the suffering of now, hopefully, one day leading to the freedom of tomorrow. Out of struggle, so will the time of quiet victory, and self-assurance be born. Where those of us with kindness, walk alongside those of difficult persuasions. She closes the collection strong leaving us both elated with hope, and sturdy with solidarity. Please buy this poetry collection, it is too exquisite to remain unread.

8. “The Secret Life Chimneys” – Agatha Christie

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Book Reviews

When I was a child I spent hours of my life watching Hercule Poirot shows with my mother. She has always loved Agatha Christie so recently I asked her what her favourite was and it wasn’t what I expected.

She choose “The Secret of Chimneys” and it is a laugh riot throughout. It does not take itself too seriously, although there is a dead man in the study. There are strong females, silly fathers and a cast of characters you cannot help but love.

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Book Reviews

7. “To The Women” – Scarlett Curtis

Book Reviews
Book Reviews

This collection of letters changed the game for me. I thought of all the women who have come before me, those I’ve known personally, and those who have fought on the front lines. When I say I cried in traffic. I genuinely did with one of the letters. The women wrote to her mother who was no longer with her. I ran home and hugged my mother.

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6. “A Game Of Thrones” – George RR Martin

Book Reviews

When the HBO show ended, I (and probably millions of others), went back to the books for solace and comfort. You cannot deny the character power of George RR Martin’s books. Although we are still two books short of a completed series, and Martin isn’t exactly a spring chicken, I live in hope that the story will conclude in an elegant threading of all storylines.

Until then I continue to read. I am on book three right now, immersed in the Song of Ice & Fire before it all went wrong.

5. “The Clan Of The Cave Bear” – Jean M. Auel

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This book set in the prehistory of humankind kicked off a series that eventually disappointed me. Following the life of a young girl who is orphaned at five years old, she is taken in by the people of the Clan. Ayla is blonde and blue-eyed and appears ugly to the Clan who are dark and ancient.

There is love, loss and learning. I recommend reading the first book, but if you are short of time, do not worry about the rest. You will be disappointed. I rated the final book 1 out of 5 on Goodreads. A sad end to an epic series.

4. “The Handmaid’s Tale” – Margaret Atwood

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Book Reviews

I wanted to read this for a long time, and I finally got around to it this year. Even though it was written in 1985, (listen I wasn’t born until 1990!). So this book really affected me. It reminded me that no matter how far we have come, empires slip into dark ages.

It has happened over centuries countless times. It happened to the ancient Egyptian empire twice! With a racist, misogynistic president in the United States, the anti-immigration rhetoric in the United Kingdom, and the complete and utter media silence on what’s happening in Sudan, I realise we are never too far from chaos.

Do yourself a favour and read this book. I won’t tell you anything about it.

3. “The Hunger” – Alma Katsu

Book Reviews
Book Reviews

This semi-historical horror novel is on plenty of top ten modern horror novels for a reason. Set during the mass migration to the American West, the wagon train known as the Donner party encounters the horrors of hunger, disease and some unknown abomination.

As you jump between perspectives you understand the paranoia of the wide-open desert, the futility of money when there is no food to be bought, and the hidden secrets people keep close to their chest, in hopes they will never be discovered.

When you pick up this book, you will need to put it down on occasion, because it will disturb you. It won’t be long before you pick it up again, to see if you can understand the reasoning for the horror.

Book Reviews
Book Reviews

2. “The Witchcraft of Salem Village” – Shirley Jackson

Book Reviews
Book Reviews

I adore Shirley Jackson, and even though The Haunting of Hill House is cited as her best novel, I would argue it is only a small insight into her genius. My favourite of hers is “We Have Always Lived In A Castle.”

When I realised that Jackson had written a semi-historical version of the events that occurred in the now abandoned Salem village, I couldn’t help myself. This is an excellent yet frightening account.

Book Reviews
Book Reviews

1. The History Of Ancient Egypt – Bob Brier

Book Reviews
Book Reviews

Ever since I was a child I have idealised ancient Egypt in my head. I would read any books about it I could get my hands on. Fascinated by the hieroglyphs, mummification and papyrus, I imagined what life was like in times more ancient than my young mind could conceive.

My mother got me a beautiful book one Christmas that was tactile and interactive. There were real letters from Egyptologists, explanations about the Rosetta stone, and tutorials on their engravings.

The earliest settlers in the Nile valley was 700,000 years ago, and it wasn’t until 70,000 years ago that they even started using hand tools. Brier’s account brings us through the first settlers through 3000 years of history, all the way to the last Pharoh of Egypt Cleopatra.

I loved this. I listened to it on audiobook from Audible over a month and Bob Brier’s storytelling is superb. If you love ancient Egyptian history, you need to experience this.

Copyright © 2019 Thinkingmoon.com – All rights reserved

 

 

 

Book Review: Building 51 – Jennifer L. Place

Preamble

Jennifer L. Place is a native of the Hudson Valley in New York. Her most recent book ‘Building 51‘, is based on a real abandoned asylum, in which the titled ‘Building 51″ is part of.

Building 51 - Jennifer L. Place
Building 51 – Jennifer L. Place

Having grown up in an area with this forgotten hospital Jennifer confesses she’s had an interest in it since childhood. It loomed in the background, and although she’d written 3 other successful books, the time came to invest in her curiosity.

She organised a tour of the sprawling campus and this shows throughout the book. Her knowledge of the grounds enhances the atmosphere of the novel. This is further boosted by accurate historical information displayed throughout. Evidence from the hospitals 140 years of life and beyond provides us with the chilling truth. Nothing that despicable ever dies.

Building 51 - Jennifer Place
Building 51 – Jennifer L. Place

 

 

If you are interested in learning more about the author herself, please feel free to head over to her website which can be found here.

 

 

 

 

The Review

As a lover of the horror genre, my initial approach to any novel within its scope is tentative. Unlike softer genres such as comedy or romance, when horror is bad, it’s awful. Therefore I was delighted to find that this story, while formulated in a classic Building 51 - Jennifer L. Placetrope, has new ideas and scares to offer. The opening shot sets group dynamics of 7 friends. They’re young, carefree, and mischievous, perfectly positioned for pain. Place jumps right into the guts of the matter as they plan to explore the abandoned hospital.

While you may make some predictions, you will not fully guess the ending. We are treated to complex character arcs, without an over indulgencing in flashbacks.  You can tell the author’s imagination is well-developed and her days pondering over the dilapidated hospital is apparent.

*Ahead there be spoilers!!!*

The ‘love’ triangle’ which plagues 3 of the characters adds to the story agreeably. I have often found this tool to be cumbersome, however, without it, the characters may have behaved differently. Place directs her characters and ultimately people break off into groups. Which you should never do in a horror story, don’t they know they’re in a book?! Although Place dips into classic horror analogies there are times the characters poke fun at this and do not make the decisions we would expect them to make.

Another theme I really loved was the classic blood ‘wakes’ the beast. It shows Place really thought about ‘the why’ when she wrote this book. The 7(also a classic horror number) friends are not just attacked because they dare to wander the grounds of the hospital. It’s is an incident where blood is spilled which causes the hospital to rouse from its slumber, and welcome its new guests.

The grandmother’s introduction was seamless and the throwback to her at the end was inspired. I think this is a sensational read and you won’t want to put the book down. So make sure you’re sitting comfortably with your beverage of choice before you embark.

Anything Else?

Yes, you can find Jennifer L. Place on all the usual platforms, and I’ve linked much of her media below. She has other books if horror is not your fancy, as you can see, so go buy one of those. You won’t be disappointed, and once again, thanks for reading Moonlings!

Building 51 - Jennifer Place
Building 51 – Jennifer Place

 

 

Copyright © 2019 Thinkingmoon.com – All rights reserved

 

Indie Reviews: Lee Hall

Preamble

Being a writer can be arduous. You have to power through imposter syndrome. Next, you have the fun exercise of convincing your family and friends that you really are a writer. Finally, after all of that, when you’re emotionally and physically exhausted, you need to take on the world.

It is my opinion, that you shouldn’t need to get the word out alone, and authors should support each other. Someone who embodies this wholeheartedly is indie author Lee Hall. If you didn’t know already Lee Hall, who works a day job, while writing awesome books on the side, also manages to read and review fellow indie authors. How he finds all the time for all of this astounds me.

On his website Lee’s Hall of Information, he has a section dedicated to indie reviews which can be found here. So what could be better than to give some of that love back by reviewing both of his books I have read. I also have a third book, so watch this space.

*warning, spoilers lay ahead!*

The Teleporter

We’ve all read the superhero books, and with the war between Marvel and D.C, it’s hard to imagine a place for a new superhero. In the midst of all that Lee Hall manages to slip in Kurt Wiseman. He’s not a regular hero, he’s not even an anti-hero, he’s just a guy.

The Teleporter - Lee Hall
The Teleporter – Lee Hall

He certainly doesn’t scream superhero. He’s a lazy drunk who doesn’t have much going for him. He gets transformed into the Teleporter by falling into a vat of goo at work. This provides him with the handy ability to teleport short distances, once he has been there before.

While he starts out by taunting bouncers who have mistreated a patron, he soon realises that there are more duties involved than simply causing a scene outside of a bar. He finds that his drinking diminishes his power and he nearly gets one of his friends hurt.

We are also offered a strong female character who doesn’t need Wiseman to get her story, she is a journalist extraordinaire. The noir superhero trope is heartily made fun of and we come away feeling refreshed in a world where superheroes are more than often imperious. Wiseman just comes out and says it, sometimes being a superhero sucks.

Here is my review on Amazon:

The Teleporter - Lee Hall
The Teleporter – Lee Hall

Darke Blood

As a fan of vampires and their lore, I always welcome a new story surrounding them. In this intriguing new perspective, you can see Hall’s influences shining through. The classics such as Stoker and the modern such as Whedon (yes you guessed it, BTVS). The story immediately begins with intrigue, and you are hooked by the main character Blake Malone. He is the classic new kind in town, except Malone not only a stranger to everyone in Darke Heath, but to himself as well. He can’t remember anything before he arrived.

Darke Blood - Lee Hall
Darke Blood – Lee Hall

Throughout the book, we are fed a back story from (in my opinion) the true protagonist, Caitlyn. We discover early on that she is a vampire, and although she is happily kicking ‘amp (vampire) ass in Darke Heath, she wasn’t always this pure soul. When we find out how she came to be a vampire along with her sordid past, and we feel very uncomfortable about it.

As the tale unfolds we are introduced to more of the mystery and intrigue. The book is ‘un-put-down-able’ as the reviewers say, and the ending is more than enough to wait for.

Here is my review on Amazon:

Lee Hall - Darke Blood
Lee Hall – Darke Blood

In Conclusion

Could y’all please head over to Lee Hall’s blog and follow him? He’s so close to 200 followers and he really deserves it. He does more for reviewing fellow indie authors than anyone I know. Also he has a new book coming out soon and you won’t want to miss that. He has more than enough books to choose from, and I’m already on my way to reading them all (like Pokémon). All his links are below.

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To quote my favourite musician Zac Brown 'ain't nothin like the real thing' 4 books published before turning 30 is pretty good going, 2 of which came out this year! Now comes the real work, promoting and convincing readers to read them. You've probably noticed I went hard on the promoting side of things recently and that's gonna slow down for a while. It's up to you guys now to spread the word whilst I take on my next project which I'm dramatically staring at in this totally non staged photo. Just what that project is you'll have to wait and see but it's not a book. Let's just say it's more of an adaptation… and remember folks don't ever accept fruit from strangers… #spoliers #cemeteryhouseselfie #bookselfie #bookrelease #paperback #rockandroll #zacbrown #zacbrownband #inspiration #indieauthorsofinstagram #bookinstagram #amwriting #horror #ceneteryhouse #writerslife

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Website:

https://leehallwriter.com/

https://leehallwriter.com/indie-book-reviews/

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/l/B071LDYX1L?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1550696734&redirectedFromKindleDbs=true&ref_=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_3&rfkd=1&shoppingPortalEnabled=true&sr=8-3

Instagram:

@this_is_lee_hall

Twitter:

@lhallwriter

Goodreads Challenge 2019!

Hello friends, I am back. My recovery took much longer than I expected but I am grateful for my family because, without them, I would have starved. This includes Le’Boo who was called my husband by one of the nurses and it made him happy! Who’d thought?

Preamble:

Anyways I’m a huge book worm, and I really enjoyed using Goodreads in 2018 to challenge myself. Plus joining groups like Emma Watson’s “Our shared shelf,” or “Books Stephen King has recommended,” makes you feel like you’re part of a community and gives you book ideas you might never have thought of yourself.

Review of 2018:

I think I was over ambitious last year with my target of 80 books, however. Although I managed 77 of those 80 it stressed me out near the end. I also exclude academic books so I probably read closer to 100 books last year. I didn’t want to include them in the books I read ‘for pleasure.’ I say it like that because all reading is pleasurable for me.

Criteria:

So this year I will be pledging 70 books and I have some criteria which ones I choose. I do not want to choose them willy nilly:

  1. I want a 50 / 50 split down the middle of female and male authors. I did pretty good last year but I’m not sure I made the 50 / 50 mark.
  2. Read more fiction. As a fiction writer, I need to read more fiction in order to learn and improve my own writing.
  3. Read more indie writers, and if you are an indie writer whose struggling to get Amazon reviews, give me a shout in the comments or email me on thinkingmoonblog@gmail.com, I’d be happy to read your book!

Join me in the Goodreads challenges, and tell me about your pledges.

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/44595266-j-c

Copyright © 2019 Thinkingmoon.com – All rights reserved

Also Tuesday fun is here:

https://thinkingmoon.com/category/tuesday-fun/

10 Books I Read This Year That I Loved

10 books I read or possibly re-read this year that I loved.

 

Hello fellow bookworms, time for another book blog boosterama. I adore books, have I mentioned that? I’m trying to read 80 (non-academic) books this year and so far I have made it to 64. I’m a little behind, however I read like a crazy mo-fo over Christmas so I think I’ll make it. 😉

 

I’ll try to go spoiler free but some of these books are older… so… spoiling may happen. Some of these books appeared in a previous post, but I needed to include them because I loved them so much!

These are in order unlike some of my other posts so you guys can argue with me in the comments if you disagree, I love a good debate. 😊

10. ‘Brave,’ – Rose McGowan.

This book made me both heartbroken for and proud of Rose McGowan. Her tough upbringing would have made most people hardened and silent. She instead directs her energies towards art as transformation. This is a very important book not just for woman, but for all oppressed humans. Bravo to Brave. You can check her out on Instagram. She’s doing cathartic things there at the moment.

Books

9. ‘Furiously Happy,’ – Jenny Lawson.

Friends I read this book in less than a day because I couldn’t put it down. I forwent sleep, and in exchange, I was rewarded with laughter. Jenny Lawson reminds us that our mental illnesses are not our masters, the blame should not lie within, and we can break free. We can work hard to combat our demons, and in the meantime be furiously happy! By the way, the raccoon on the front is a taxidermy owned by the author. Oh yes.

Furiously Happy - J Lawson

8. ‘The Alchemist,’ – Paulo Coehlo.

When I bought this book, I was skeptical, because I had not heard one bad review from anyone. They were all correct, it was absolutely amazing. It will give you a strange feeling. If you have not read this you need to. This is my second time reading it, it’s healing.

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7. ‘The Princess’ Diarist,’ – Carrie Fisher.

Get this on audiobook from audible, trust me. It’s worth it to hear Carrie Fisher tell her age-old tale, in her uniquely hilarious voice. Her wonderful daughter Billie Lourd also reads a section as Fisher’s ‘younger self.’ So sweet and at the same time, sad. I miss her so much. RIP Carrie Fisher.

The Princess Diarist - Carrie Fisher

6. ‘The Haunting Of Hill House,’ – Shirley Jackson.

So this came out on Netflix as a new series and in true Jaycee fashion, I had to read the book before I watched the show. Well, now I’m scared to watch the show! When I say she’s a horror legend, believe me.

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5. ‘Americanah,’ – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

This book is Poetry. It’s even better served as an audiobook. I listened to Adjoa Andoh’s narration and it was fantastic. Read this book, but if you can listen to it as well. I thoroughly enjoyed it. I looked forward to my morning and evening commutes so I could hear more about the lives of Ifemelu and Obinze.

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4. ‘Cosmos,’ – Carl Sagan

I adored this book. Although it was written nearly 40 years ago, it still feels as fresh and uplifting as ever. You need to read this book, it will change your perspective on our wonderful universe. It inspired so many people including some of my personal favourites, Professor Brian Cox and Neil Degrasse Tyson. “I have loved the stars too fondly, to be fearful of the night.”

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3. ‘The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon,’ – Stephen King.

I have read many many Stephen King books and he has never disappointed me. With this book, he actually surprised me. He kept his supernatural element as an undercurrent to the book, while the true strength of human nature came in the form of a young girl, who wanted to survive. This story will grip you while putting you right there in the forest with her.

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2. ‘The History Of Bees,’ – Maja Lunde.

What a wonderful book. Also what a harrowing message. Lunde tells the story of our world if our bees began to disappear tomorrow. We get a story told through three different very perspectives, yet we feel their pain as though it were our own. Lunde tells us what scientists have been trying to convey for years now. If we don’t look after our bees, the world will be a very different place.

A History Of Bees - Maja Lunde

1. ‘We Have Always Lived In A Castle,’ – Shirley Jackson.

Having truly enjoyed and been scared by ‘The Haunting of Hill House’ I had a book hangover when it was over. Io I thought I would give more Jackson’s work a try, to alleviate the pain of finishing a great book. This one was unbelievable and my favourite book I’ve read in 2018. I can’t believe I only discovered Jackson now, as a huge fan of horror I thought I’d read it all until I read ‘We Have Always Lived In A Castle.’ Check it out, my friends.

Books
Books

Ok my lovey loves that’s all for today. Sorry, it’s a bit short but I have an ongoing project that had a deadline. If it works out I will be able to let you in on it. If it doesn’t well it will fall into the annals of the internet, buried under memes and

What am I writing poetry or something?

https://thinkingmoon.com/category/stories/

Female Authors

Hello, fellow bookworms! I see you there. 😉 In this post, I would like to talk about my Goodreads challenge along with the female authors I’ve read since January. I won’t be necessarily reviewing the books because I don’t want to spoil any of them on you, but I will be talking about how they affected me.

I set myself a goal of 80 non-work related books to read this year. If you’re on Goodreads why not come join me on my quest. How many have you pledged? Here is a link to my profile:

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/44595266-j-c

So far I’ve accomplished 52 of the total 80 which is 65%. As you can see from this very hi-tech screen grab below.

Female Authors
Female Authors

As part of this challenge, I want at least half of those 80 books to be from female authors. Although I have read many female authors in my time, I wanted to make a conscious effort to give equal support to both male and female authors this year.

The following 20 books I’m going to discuss are from female authors I’ve read this year. Seeing as I’ve already read 52 books and only 20 of them are female authors, I’ve  some catching up to do.

Let me know in the comments below if you love/hate any of these books and why? Maybe one of these are on your ‘to be read’ list. Let’s have a chat.  Ok let us not waste any more time, we begin.

Book number 1: ‘The Bell Jar’ – Sylvia Plath

Female Authors
The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath

As far back as secondary school (high school for my American friends), I’ve loved the poetry of Sylvia Plath. Her melancholy resonated with miserable teenage Jenni. At Christmas I received her only novel as a gift from my parents and proceeded to read it on the 1st of January. What an interesting way to start this year of books. Although it was a compelling read, I still feel her poetry is superior. It’s essential reading for anyone suffering from bipolar disorder, and although it’s not necessarily autobiographical, there are many parallels to Plath’s own life.

Book number 2: ‘Talking As Fast As I Can’ – Lauren Graham

Talking As Fast As I Can - Lauren Graham
Talking As Fast As I Can – Lauren Graham

I have mentioned before on this blog that I have an Audible account. It allowed me to listen to several of these books in the voice of their author. As a huge Gilmore Girls fan, I knew that this book would be best consumed audibly and I was correct. Graham does talk fast, but she keeps a sensible pace so you enjoy full extent of her funny anecdotal life.

Book number 3: ‘How To Be A Bawse’ – Lilly Singh

Female Authors
How To Be A Bawse – Lilly Singh

If you don’t know who Lilly Singh is, I’m really sorry. Here is her YouTube channel. Go ahead and subscribe. I’ll wait…

https://www.youtube.com/user/IISuperwomanII

…done? Did you watch a video or two? I know she’s great, you’re welcome. Now back to her book. There are so many self-help/ motivational books out there. This is one of the good ones. Honestly, she not only deals with the ins and outs of being a Bawse, but she explicitly explains her experiences with depression.

You also get the added bonus of it not only being read in the author’s voice but with some surprise guests. It’s an inspirational read.

Book number 4: ‘Americanah’ – Chimananda Ngozi Adichie

Female Authors
Adjoa Andoh

I thought this novel was phenomenal. I was a fan of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie from her speech “We Should All Be Feminists,” so I wanted to give one of her novels a try. Although this one isn’t read by the author herself, it’s beautifully narrated by the talented Adjoa Andoh who brings the different accents to life. It was highly rated on Audible and I wasn’t disappointed. It’s an exquisitely winding love story between Nigeria and the United States of America. Treat yourself with this yarn.

Book number 5: ‘Wishful Drinking’ – Carrie Fisher

Female Authors
Wishful Drinking – Carrie Fisher

When I heard the news that we lost Carrie Fisher, I was devastated. I am such a huge Star Wars fan, and she was one of the first examples of a strong female character that I remember. Along with being such a wonderful personality, she’s also an excellent writer. Her voice (both literary and physical) is so unique. She finds the funny in both the darkness and the light of life. I don’t even have to individually single out any of her books because they are all awesome.

Book number 6: ‘The Princess Diarist’ – Carrie Fisher

Female Authors
The Princess Diarist – Carrie Fisher

Speaking of Carrie Fisher did I mentioned that I love her? In this audiobook, you also get a section narrated by her daughter Billie Lourd.

Book number 7: ‘Furiously Happy’ – Jenny Lawson

Female Authors
Furiously Happy – Jenny Lawson

This book has been on so many “10 books to read if you suffer from depression,” or “15 books by female authors,” or “books by online personalities,” that I had to bite the bullet and get it. While the cover is exceptionally attractive and draws you in even before you open the book, the contents are even crazier. It will make you laugh I promise, you’ll be so annoying you’ll want to read sections of it out loud to the person next to you (sorry Le Boo!). If you haven’t heard of her you can check her out here:

http://thebloggess.com/

(Jennis unite!)

Book number 8: ‘Brave’ – Rose McGowan

Female Authors
Brave – Rose McGowan

Rose McGowan has been such a controversial figure, and part of me really wonders how would she be received if she were a man. I am a fan of her hubris, I think she genuinely is brave when you account for all she’s been through. This book is an eye-opener and at times very distressing. The story of her struggle began way before her rape. She has been homeless, she grew up in a cult, and her home life, in general, was very tumultuous.

If you haven’t yet, read this book. Or listen to it on Audible. (I’m not sponsored by Audible by the way, I really wish I was though!)

Book number 9: ‘The Great Gasbag’ – Joy Behar

The Great Gasbag - J Behar
The Great Gasbag – Joy Behar

This book was a bit of light reading between books with a heavier subject. I’m a huge fan of The View which Joy Behar calls her home. Whoopi Goldberg is my Queen. Behar is the only remaining original panel member and she is not winding down. This book may be humorous, but she knows her stuff. Read it for a laugh or read it for the political facts. Either way, you’ll get what you came for.

Book number 10: ‘Repeal The 8th’­ – Una Mullally

Female Authors
Repeal The 8th – (Edited by) Una Mullally

This was a tough read in the lead up to the referendum. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, you can read my post about it:

https://thinkingaheadblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/20/why-im-voting-yes-on-may-25th/

This book is a collection of essays, personal stories, and poetry. It made me cry like a small child. It made me angry and see red. It also showed me the value of my vote. I was voting, not only for myself but for all the women that came before and all those who would come after. It was just downright powerful.

Book Number 11: ‘A Line Made By Walking’  – Sara Blaume

Female Authors
A Line Made By Walking – Sara Baume

I’ve spoken about my mental illness here in the past 6 months and any story that continues the conversation is worth reading. This story is set in Ireland, following an artist struggling to cope with her mental health issues. The story has the added dimension of being both unique and uncomfortably familiar at the same time. The images painted by the author are still stuck in my mind, and the cover of this book drew me in inexplicably. It’s also nice to support Irish authors when possible.

Book Number 12: ‘The History of Bees’ – Maja Lunde

A History Of Bees - Maja Lunde
The History Of Bees – Maja Lunde

Heard of this book before? Always meant to give it a read? Well, get on it because it’s fantastic. If you’re like me and you’re worried about the bees (I’m not crazy they help grow our food), this book will reinforce you, while frightening those who are unaware of the dangers in a dwindling bee population.

An intermingling tale of three parts, Lunde manages to both connect people who have never met while demonstrating their utterly alien experiences. The narrators are all terribly flawed so that we feel at home with them, and by the end, you’ll be trembling with worry about our little fuzzy friends.

Book Number 13: ‘Swing Time’ – Zadie Smith

Female Authors
Swing Time – Zadie Smith

Although college and the books I read back then feels like many eons ago (I did only graduate from my Bachelors in 2010), I distinctly remember a novel called ‘White Teeth’ by Zadie Smith. I hadn’t read anything else of hers since and I was in Waterstones one day perusing when this bright yellow book caught my eye. Sure enough, it was Zadie Smith. I’d always promised I would read more of her but never got around to it. I decided to buy it there and then, and she’s still got it.

Book Number 14: ‘Grace’s Guide’ – Grace Helbig

Female Authors
Grace’s Guide – Grace Helbig

Grace Helbig has a lifestyle/comedy YouTube channel whose brand is socially awkward. Although her YouTube content appeals to the painfully bumbling teenager girl inside, I was actually disappointed by this book. She seemed to get this book deal when many YouTubers were also getting book deals because of their online clout with young audiences. The novelty of this novel falls short, and while you might get more of an insight into the person behind Grace Helbig, you will get nothing but recycled life advice from this. (Sorry Grace!)

Book Number 15: ‘No Seriously… I’m kidding’ – Ellen DeGeneres

Female Authors
Seriously…I’m Kidding – Ellen DeGeneres

This book is worth more than the €1 I paid for it in a second-hand shop. It was a lovely light companion for awhile between otherwise serious life times. Also, who doesn’t love Ellen?

Book Number 16: ‘Wicca Starter Kit’ – Lisa Chamberlain

Wicca Starting Kit - Lisa Chamberlain
Wicca Starter Kit – Lisa Chamberlain

This book, and the next were research for something I’m writing. I was surprised at the many misconceptions I had about Wicca, and I found these books useful in my own life. As someone who likes to experience slowly and deliberately, this book came through with many basic tools to survive in a modern world. When you feel as though you’re completely out of touch with nature and your own natural bodily rhythms these paradigms will help.

Book Number 17: ‘Witchcraft Theory & Practice’ – Ly De Angeles

Female Authors
Witchcraft Theory & Practice – Ly De Angeles

As I said this book was also for research purposes. It turned out to be a bargain for the €1 I paid in a second-hand shop. (I love thrifting books). This book, unlike the last one, is more explicit in its explanations, recommendations, and value. Wicca and witchcraft have been attached to women for millennia. It is your due diligence as a feminist to understand it’s history.

Book Number 18: ‘Nefertiti’ – Joyce Tyldesley

Female Authors
Nefertiti – Joyce Tyldesley

 

Simply put Tyldesley has an insanely impressive repertoire of writings and books on the subject of ancient Egypt. Although she has books which are concerned with the civilization as a whole, she is also known for books like this one, which are biographies of those long dead. You’ll get the idea from the full title, ‘Nefertiti: Unlocking The Mystery Surrounding Egypt’s Most Famous And Beautiful Queen.‘ If you want to get an idea about what Nefertiti was like, outside of her famous Berlin Bust (pictured on the novel’s cover), you can read this book.

Book Number 19: ‘You Can’t Fix Stupid’ –  Terry & Linda Jameson

Female Authors
You Can’t Fix Stupid – Terry & Linda Jameson

This is another fun book, that I read in a day. I actually took it with me when I was getting one of my tattoos. I kept chuckling and moving much the chagrin of my tattoo artist. If you know anything about the Psychic Twins you’ll enjoy this book, if you don’t you’ll still enjoy it.

They recently started a YouTube channel in which they discuss many interesting things, while also collabing with many other established YouTubers. I enjoyed this book, and you really can’t fix stupid. Have a look at their channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJZSVCGZksXJWlQECPJvk1A

Book Number 20: ‘Hatchepsut’ – Joyce Tyldesley

Female Authors
Hatchepsut – Joyce Tyldesley

Finally as with the other Joyce Tyldesley book on this list, ‘Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh.’ is an intense read. I credit the depth of the characterisation to Tyldesley’s extensive archaeological fieldwork experience.

Copyright © 2018 Thinkingmoon.com – All rights reserved

Now that my friends is all for now. Liked what you read here? Why not try my previous list blogs?

https://thinkingaheadblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/04/28-female-musicians-i-adore/

https://thinkingaheadblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/15/lets-learn-about-me/

 

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